Arkansas Tax Filing

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How to File Your Arkansas Taxes

Taxpayers in Arkansas enjoy some deductions on special occasions. For example, IRA distributions to citizens that reached the age of 59½ are not taxable (up to the amount of $6,000). Moreover, in the case of a taxpayer’s death or disability, payments are also tax-free.

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Arkansas Tax Forms

Determine Your Residency Status

The amount of your taxes depends on your residency status, so check below to see which category you fall in.

You Are a Resident of Arkansas

If you had a domicile home in Arkansas for the whole year, you are an Arkansas resident. If this is the case, and you earned a more than the allowable amount (see below), then you need to use Form-1000 to file your tax return (see the Arkansas 2016 Individual Income Tax instructions which you can download above).

When do you need to file Form-1000? In the following cases: if you made a gross income of more than $7,800 (as a single person), $12,100 (as a head of household), $15,500 (as a married couple filing jointly), $3,999 (if married, but filing separately), or $15,500 (as a widow).

You Are a Part-Year Resident in Arkansas

If you resided in Arkansas for only part of the year (for example, if you moved in or out of the state during the year), you are considered a part-year resident. In this case, you have to file your income tax return if you earned any income in Arkansas.

To file your part-year resident taxes, use Form-1000NR. For any other related information, see the Arkansas 2016 Individual Income Tax instructions which you can download above.

You Are an Arkansas Resident Who Works in a Different State

If you are an Arkansas resident and work in a different state, you will nevertheless be taxed by Arkansas, as Arkansas taxes all income made by its residents, no matter where the income is earned. In order to avoid dual taxation (as the state where you work will probably also tax your income), Arkansas offers credit for taxes paid in a different state. This credit goes up to the amount of tax that you have to pay to the state of Arkansas. To request a tax credit in Arkansas, attach a copy of the return filed in the other state to your Arkansas Form-1000 return.

You Are a Nonresident Who Worked or Sold Property in Arkansas

If you did not have your domicile in Arkansas during the year, you are a nonresident. However, if you made some taxable money in Arkansas (including sold property), you have to file a nonresident tax return with this state. Arkansas does not have a minimum taxable threshold, so any taxable income made here will be taxed. To file your nonresident Arkansas return, use Form-1000NR. For any other related information, see the Arkansas 2016 Individual Income Tax instructions which you can download above.